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Thursday, 15 May 2014

Well - appointed house


Hello.

It has been a long time since I've posted last on ettiquette. We have been talking about the art of conversationgracious living, and various different things from books, articles...



We are yet to touch the subject of proper homes. A big subject, according to Emily Post. 

Every house has an outward appearance to be made as presentable as possible, an interior continually to be set in order, and incessantly to be cleaned. And for those that dwell within it there are meals to be prepared and served; linen to be laundered and mended; personal garments to be brushed and pressed; and perhaps children to be cared for. There is also a door-bell to be answered in which manners as well as appearance come into play.
Are you up for it?
Let' s take a closer look on this, new subject of our mutual learning.. all of the text here presented is from Emily Post's book called "Etiquette - In society, in business, in politics and at home"

The Lady herself  - Emily Post


Beyond these fundamental necessities, luxuries can be added indefinitely, such as splendor of architecture, of gardening, and of furnishing, with every refinement of service that executive ability can produce. With all this genuine splendor possible only to the greatest establishments, a little house can no more compete than a diamond weighing but half a carat can compete with a stone weighing fifty times as much. And this is a good simile, because the perfect little house may be represented by a corner cut from precisely the same stone and differing therefore merely in size (and value naturally), whereas the house in bad taste and improperly run may be represented by a diamond that is off color and full of flaws; or in some instances, merely a piece of glass that to none but those as ignorant as its owner, for a moment suggests a gem of value.

A gem of a house may be no size at all, but its lines are honest, and its painting and window curtains in good taste. As for its upkeep, its path or sidewalk is beautifully neat, steps scrubbed, brasses polished, and its bell answered promptly by a trim maid with a low voice and quiet courteous manner; all of which contributes to the impression of "quality" evens though it in nothing suggests the luxury of a palace whose opened bronze door reveals a row of powdered footmen.

But the "mansion" of bastard architecture and crude paint, with its brass indifferently clean, with coarse lace behind the plate glass of its golden-oak door, and the bell answered at eleven in the morning by a butler in an ill fitting dress suit and wearing a mustache, might as well be placarded: "Here lives a vulgarian who has never had an opportunity to acquire cultivation." As a matter of fact, the knowledge of how to make a house distinguished both in appearance and in service, is a much higher test than presenting a distinguished appearance in oneself and acquiring presentable manners. There are any number of people who dress well, and in every way appear well, but a lack of breeding is apparent as soon as you go into their houses. Their servants have not good manners, they are not properly turned out, the service is not well done, and the decorations and furnishings show lack of taste and inviting arrangement.

The personality of a house is indefinable, but there never lived a lady of great cultivation and charm whose home, whether a palace, a farm-cottage or a tiny apartment, did not reflect the charm of its owner. Every visitor feels impelled to linger, and is loath to go. Houses without personality are a series of rooms with furniture in them. Sometimes their lack of charm is baffling; every article is "correct" and beautiful, but one has the feeling that the decorator made chalk-marks indicating the exact spot on which each piece of furniture is to stand. Other houses are filled with things of little intrinsic value, often with much that is shabby, or they are perhaps empty to the point of bareness, and yet they have that "inviting" atmosphere, and air of unmistakable quality which is an unfailing indication of high-bred people.

"Becoming" Furniture

Suitability is the test of good taste always. The manner to the moment, the dress to the occasion, the article to the place, the furniture to the background. And yet to combine many periods in one and commit no anachronism, to put something French, something Spanish, something Italian, and something English into an American house and have the result the perfection of American taste—is a feat of legerdemain that has been accomplished time and again.


A woman of great taste follows fashion in house furnishing, just as she follows fashion in dress, in general principles only. She wears what is becoming to her own type, and she puts in her house only such articles as are becoming to it.
That a quaint old-fashioned house should be filled with quaint old-fashioned pieces of furniture, in size proportionate to the size of the rooms, and that rush-bottomed chairs and rag-carpets have no place in a marble hall, need not be pointed out. But to an amazing number of persons, proportion seems to mean nothing at all. They will put a huge piece of furniture in a tiny room so that the effect is one of painful indigestion; or they will crowd things all into one corner—so that it seems about to capsize; or they will spoil a really good room by the addition of senseless and inappropriately cluttering objects, in the belief that because they are valuable they must be beautiful, regardless of suitability. Sometimes a room is marred by "treasures" clung to for reasons of sentiment.

I hope you have enjoyed this part.. and I promise to post second one really soon.
Marija

6 comments:

  1. This was a really neat little post. A lot of this is stuff that I think people have forgotten about these days - in order have a nice house, it has to be large, and perfectly appointed, and pinterest-worthy. Just keeping things clean and putting a little bit of thought into some decorations is really all it takes. I would really like to have a maid with a low, courteous voice, though. My boyfriend's not much of a substitute. ;)

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    1. Maid would be helpful.
      But, since majority of us hasn't got the chance to have one, I advise the simple rule: keep it clean, tidy, and paint it regularly (our folks believe that you can sort out most of the stuff just by paining them - and it's true). :)

      Great to have you here, dear.

      Marija

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  2. My fellow Jessica took the words right out of my mouth. I think that people have often forgotten that a home is a place to dwell and grow, raise a family, lay our tired heads and seek an almost primal kind of comfort. It is not merely a place to store our endless shopping spree of items and to try and outdo our neighbours, friends and even total strangers with by going into to debt to have the trendiest or most lavish abode. We could all do well to look to the past on this front - at least some of the time.

    ♥ Jessica

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    1. My people have a great love toward our houses - love and respect. To us, house is a home, a place to truly rest peacefully and be ourselves. We cherish our homes; I can't say every house is fit to be featured in a magazine, but I dare say: we don't mind that it's small and not filled with lavish furnishings.. it's tidy, and it's all that matters..

      Marija

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  3. Unfortunately the house I currently live it just isn't a home. After we were hit with a personal tragedy, it just hasn't been the same. I really miss that. :-(

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    1. Oh, dear..
      I'm so sorry to hear about your trouble. I do hope your life will get back to it's track really soon.

      Marija

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